Welcome To

Nested in the Eastern coal fields of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Pike County was established in the year 1821; it was created out of a portion of Floyd County as the 70th county formed in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Pike County was named in honor of General Zebulon M. Pike and is home to former Governor Paul Patton. A small portion of Pike County was used in 1870, towards forming Martin County to the north. Pike County is the easternmost county in Kentucky and is bounded by Martin County to the North, West Virginia to the Northeast and East, Virginia to the Southeast and South, by Letcher County to the Southwest and by Floyd County to the West. Pike County is drained exclusively by the two forks of the Big Sandy River the Levisa River and the Tug Fork River.

Transportation in and out of Pike County comes primarily from U.S. 23, North to South and U.S. 119 East to West as well as U.S. 460.  We also receive service from both CSX and Norfolk Southern railroads. 

Commercial air service to and from Pikeville-Pike County Regional Airport is scheduled to begin in March 2014.
Pike County‚Äôs official U.S. Census population for 2010 was 65,024.  Pike County is approximately 788 square miles, making it the largest land area county in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.


The county seat of Pike County is the City of Pikeville with other cities and towns of Elkhorn City, Phelps, South Williamson and Coal Run Village.

 

Education is important in Pike County, secondary and elementary education is provided by the Pike County and the Pikeville Independent public school systems. In Pike County we have several higher education options to offer we have a four year liberal arts college, the University of Pikeville and a campus of the Big Sandy Community and Technical College, which is a member of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, offering two year degrees with transfer options to all major colleges and universities in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Pike County also is home to the University of Pikeville Kentucky School of Osteopathic Medicine.

Published on  January 24th, 2014